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Baby
Exit Entry Permit
Our baby boy Wouter was born in China, but we got him a Dutch passport. According to the Chinese government, he is still a Chinese citizen. We want to visit the Netherlands with Wouter. In order to cross the Chinese border, he needs a special Exit&Entry permit. The reasoning of the Chinese government is that since he is Chinese, he needs some Chinese document to show at the border. They will not recognize his Dutch passport. The Entry&Exit permit is a small passport-like permit that will allow him to pass the border out of China. When we arrive at the Dutch border, we can just use his Dutch passport.

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Exit and Entry Permit of the People's Republic of China


Last Updated ( Saturday, 02 July 2011 )
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Dutch passport baby born in China
Parents of babies born in China have to do quite a lot of paperwork to obtain foreign citizenship and passport. I'll explain the procedure for a Dutch parent (me) and a Chinese parent (my wife). Previously declaring birth (without a Hukou) was complex, but the Dutch requirements have been relaxed in March 2011. Now the parents only need a legalized certified copy of the MBC. Good news!

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Medical Birth Certificate book

Last Updated ( Monday, 07 March 2011 )
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We have a baby-boy
Wednesday (9 February) morning around 9 o'clock my wife delivered our Dutch-Chinese baby and it was a boy! We're calling him Wouter (a traditional Dutch name) and he looks very healthy. The contractions started around midnight, just as we wanted to sleep. At first we waited for a while to see what would happen, but around 1 o'clock Xiaoxiong had to go to toilet very often and it was 'leaking' so much that we suspected the water had broken. We called my parents-in-law and then we went to the Far East hospital in Shenzhen, near Dong Men.

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Wouter is yawning and opening his eyes

Last Updated ( Thursday, 07 April 2011 )
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Chinese name
Picking a name for your baby is never easy in any language, but I believe it cannot be more difficult than picking a Chinese name. If you want to register your mixed child in China, you will need to pick a name consisting of Chinese characters and based on the surname of the Chinese parent. In the Netherlands there are lists of popular given names, but in China it's much more complicated.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 06 February 2011 )
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Relax 1-child-policy in 3 years
Today I heard a rumor: within 3 years the one-child policy will be further relaxed. Currently if both parents are a single-child, they can have two children. Within 3 years the government will change this and only require one of the parents to be single child.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 06 February 2011 )
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Hukou for mixed kids
One of the most important decisions that parents of mixed children need to make is whether or not to get a hukou for their child. Basically you have two options, with a third (illegal) one also very common. First of all, you can apply for the nationality of the foreign parent and try to renounce the Chinese nationality. Secondly it's possible to give the child only the Chinese nationality and thus get a hukou. Finally it's possible, but illegal, to get both nationalities. Illegal under Chinese law, but legal under Dutch law. So what to do? Let's explore the advantages and disadvantages:
Last Updated ( Sunday, 30 January 2011 )
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Health insurance newborn baby China
With less than one month to my wife's due-date, we've been looking into health insurances for the baby. It turns out that getting health insurance after 30 days is no problem, but getting coverage during the first 30 days is a big problem! Without a Hukou, you obviously cannot get social insurance. Unfortunately none of the commercial insurance policies covers newborn babies either.
 
Last Updated ( Tuesday, 25 January 2011 )
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Financial benefits one child
The Chinese government has a wide variety of measures in place to ensure the one-child policy is still enforced, even after 30 years. The negative enforcements (financial punishments) are most well known. If you work for the government, having a second child will probably also influence your career. The government also uses positive enforcements though, in the form of free checkups, free delivery, free vaccinations, longer maternity leave etc. It's a whole system, without any obvious loopholes for the majority of people. We'll explore the financial benefits of one child in this article.
Last Updated ( Thursday, 18 November 2010 )
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One-child policy for mixed couples
I always assumed that if we wanted two children in China, it should be no problem because I am not Chinese, even though my wife is. Till recently this was indeed mostly true, because you could just apply for the nationality of one of the parents for the baby and then renounce the Chinese nationality (from within China). You would then get an Exit permit and with that you could come back to China and apply for a residence permit, based on close relationship with the Chinese parent. This has changed, in such a way that foreigners living in China will have more problems getting a second child as well!


Last Updated ( Monday, 30 August 2010 )
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Pregnant in Shenzhen
This is the first article in a series I will write to document my experiences with pregnancy in China. First of all: I'm glad I'm the father and not the mother! Xiaoxiong has been throwing up for a few weeks now, though things should improve soon as we have now passed the first trimester. During this period, Xiaoxiong has already had several tests in the hospital to monitor the pregnancy, her health and, this being China, we have had to get permission to deliver this baby as well. Then there are all the strange beliefs and customs in China. We'll come to that later.
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Last Updated ( Saturday, 07 August 2010 )
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